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Genetics can be responsible for a whole host of things, from that male pattern baldness you’ve been struggling with to why you’re such an asshole during rush hour. But if you would’ve told us just yesterday that a woman’s predilection to cheat could be be influence by her genetic makeup, we would’ve told you, in a forceful and stern manner, to get out of town.

RELATED: A new sex survey found that there’s a decent amount of people out there who really don’t know what cheating is

But, according to recent research, it looks like cheating may be genetic after all. Apparently there’s a link between specific mutations of the receptor gene for vasopressin —  a hormone that deal with sexual motivation and how we relate to others around us — and infidelity. And it’s only in women.

With that information in mind, a group of scientists the University of Queensland in Australia studied a sample of 7,378 people. The study was led by Dr. Brendan P. Zietsch, and it found that of the people who had been in a relationship in the past year, 9.8 percent men and 6.4 percent of women admitted to cheating on their partner. They then collected saliva samples and sequencing genomes, and by doing so, they were able to make a connection between genetics and infidelity. Well, at least when it came to women.

Per Maxim:

After taking other factors such as environment and development into account, the scientists concluded that about 40 percent of the variation in cheating behavior in women was genetic.

“We found significant genetic influences accounting for around half the variation in extra pair mating in both sexes, confirming biological underpinnings to the behavior,” the authors said.

The researchers did admit that their findings require more research, but if you catch that special woman if your life creeping around and she says it’s not her fault, she very well could be right.

(h/t Maxim)

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